Healing Takes Time—And a Nutritionally Boosted Diet

Proper nutrition is always best practice. But when you’re wounded, it’s imperative that you pay extra attention to your diet if you want to heal more quickly. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics has recently come forward with updated dietary recommendations.

Eat Well, Feel Well Sooner

On a daily basis, the foods you choose to ingest play a factor in how you feel. But if you are hurt and your body is wounded, you actually need to up your nutritional game.

Most wounds, when they remain uninfected, heal pretty quickly, especially if they are minor cuts and scrapes. However, wounds that are, large, too close to bone, or become badly infected will require medical care.

Your body will require boosted nourishment for healing the injury. Nutrients can be depleted from weeping wounds. In order to promote healing from any serious wound, your body will need an increase in vitamins, minerals, proteins, and hydration.

Healthy Healing Dietary Recommendations

The nutritional “wound healing” recommendations of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics are fairly similar to what most health experts suggest. Here is an overview:

1 ) Eat an ample amount of calories, proportioned properly between proteins, vegetables, fruits, dairy, grains, and good fats. Your dinner plate should be half-filled with green vegetables. A quarter should be protein. The last quarter should be shared with good carbs and good fats.

Some good veggies: broccoli, kale, spinach, Brussels sprouts, and asparagus

Some good proteins: fish, chicken, turkey, tofu, grass-fed beef, and lentils.

Some good carbs: brown rice, quinoa, beets, sweet potatoes and carrots.

Some good fats: milks: coconut, almond, soy, and rice; flaxseed oil, avocado, and nuts

2) Aim for at least 80 grams of protein. (20-30 grams each meal plus 10 or more for each snack.)

3) Stay hydrated. Drink water, milk: almond, soy, coconut, or rice, fresh-squeezed juices. Avoid caffeine and alcohol as they tend to dehydrate.

4) If you’re diabetic, work with a dietician to keep your blood sugar levels controlled.

Vitamin Recommendations

The Cleveland Clinic proposes upping your intake of protein, vitamin A and C, as well as Zinc to promote wound healing. Here are some suggestions for foods high in those specific vitamin and mineral content.

Vitamin A: Dark green, leafy veggies, liver, fortified cereals, carrots, and orange and yellow veggies.

Vitamin C: Berries, citrus fruits, broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage

Zinc: Beef, kidney beans, oysters, shrimp

For other updates on best health practices, check out www.GetThrive.com

 

 

Mindful De-Cluttering: How to Reduce Stress from Mess

Ever at home, look around, and get freaked out by the mess? Cleaning is one thing, but clutter is another. Mindful de-cluttering will reduce your stress, actually bring you joy—and here’s how to do it…

Make a Date

The first thing necessary is to make time to face your belongings (some of which you forgot you even had.) You don’t need as much time as you think. Don’t put it off because you’re afraid it will take hours.

Plan to tackle one small area at a time. Put aside one hour. You can look at your calendar and make a date for your de-cluttering session. If you’re on a deadline, you’ll get more done than if you put aside an entire day. Get as much done as possible in that time span, and then make a new date for your next session.

Mindful Move-Along

In the time you set aside, try not to let anything interrupt you. Let calls go to voicemail and answer texts after your hour is up. This is one important element of mindfulness in this mission.

Mindful anything requires your complete focus. If you truly want to de-clutter (which you should to reduce your stress levels) then you have to be contemplative and truthful with yourself as you peruse your items. Which ones will stay, and which will go?

Here are a few examples of how to approach your de-cluttering project.

The Kitchen

Let’s, for example, use one of our hours on the refrigerator. Looking at the front of it—is it covered with magnets, photos, fingerprints, and school papers? Take everything off. Only put up what you absolutely want to look at everyday. Papers should go in an office space or the information placed in an app on your phone.

Check out the inside of the fridge. Are there bottles of old salad dressing that you’ll never use? Dump them. Throw out anything spoiled, expired, or that you know you’ll never use. You won’t miss it. Give good stuff to the food bank if you won’t use it.

How about that end drawer over from the silverware? That’s right, the one that’s so full it gets stuck, and you can’t open it. Rubber bands, tacks, notepaper, pens from the mechanic, and keys you have no idea to what they belong. Empty it.

Keep only what works and what you’ll absolutely need. Toss broken things you know you’ll never get around to fixing. Numbers on scraps of paper can go in your phone. This is going to be so much fun!

The Bedroom

Check out your clothes closet. Are there pants that don’t fit and never will again? How about that blouse you wouldn’t be caught dead in. Donate them. Get rid of old, smelly shoes. The really cool part of this session is that you will get to know which clothes you really love. Then, wear them. No one sees them in the closet. Enjoy the items you adore!

The Bathroom

How many lipsticks do you have that have changed color from time erosion? There’s a bottle of lotion with a squirt left that’s so old it’s hardened. Have you taken a whiff of that perfume your grandmother gave you? Would you really wear it and purposefully want to smell that way? Are there more than 10 magazines by the toilet? Keeping these things around create clutter and brain chaos whether you think so or not.

Mindful Honesty

Don’t be afraid to look at things around the house and admit you don’t want to look at them. Everything (if there’s clutter) can’t be your favorite. However, you can, over the course of time, reclaim your space. Endeavor it to be rich with things you only need or absolutely love. All of the rest can fall by the wayside and bring you the lightness you need and deserve. Happy de-cluttering!

 

Is the Middle of the Day the Best Time to Exercise?

There’s a lot of speculation as to the optimum time of day to reap the most benefits from exercise. A recent study, however, shows that our muscles may respond best in the middle of the day.

Get Your Groove On

No matter what any study reports, exercise will be beneficial any time of day. As long as you show up and do the work, your body will love you for it. This information from this particular research will help those wanting to reap maximum benefits from a workout—whether you’re someone who hits the gym four times a week or if you’re a seasoned athlete.

Circle, Canadian, Cartha…What?

Researchers at Northwestern University discovered that cell metabolism is regulated by a person’s circadian rhythm. Your circadian schedule is basically your 24-hour inner clock. It informs your body when it is awake time or sleep time (and vice versa.)

It turns out that muscle tissue also responds to this inner clock. Energy efficiency, then, peaks for each individual (human) during the day. As part of the research, they studied nocturnal animals and their muscle responses. For them, logically, their finest hours of energy efficiency were in the middle of the night.

Breathing, Awake Muscles

As we carry on throughout our day, our energy levels will be more efficient than in the evening, for example. That’s not to say that you can’t workout at night. You can. And even then, your body’s metabolism will remain faster for hours afterwards. It’s just that burning energy and oxygenizing muscle cells won’t be at their peak.

It appears that muscle cells can utilize energy best (in humans) in the daytime. Exactly what time will vary according to each person’s personal circadian rhythm.

Muscle Performance

It’s true that if you workout in the morning, you will reap the benefit for hours as your day continues. Exercise raises your metabolism.

The researchers of this particular experiment believe that when your muscle cells are optimally oxygenated, the perks of exercise are even greater. So, depending on the time of day, along with glucose and then the generation of lactic acid, your workout could be fantastically phenomenal.

Other Benefits

Although this theory will require further studies, it’s an interesting look into how to possibly manipulate oxygen and sugar levels in muscles. That is something that could eventually lead to an alternative approach to treatment for diabetes.

It could also become a strategy for serious and professional athletes. Finding out their optimum time of day when to train could increase their performance potential.

Regardless of if you exercise for personal fitness, or if you push your body for sports or other training, taking the time—whatever time of day—is what’s most important. Get the job done.

High Stress Jobs May Not Be As Unhealthy as You Think

High demand jobs can certainly cause stress, which can eventually lead to poor health, chronic illness, and even early death. A new study, however, reveals how the concept of “control” may improve your health, even in a high-stress position.

Organizational Behavior

According to the results of a seven-year study, health and mortality are not necessarily linked to a high-demand job. It’s the level of control the employee has (or even perceives she has) that shifts the pendulum.

A worker experiences greater stress and unhappiness when a manager assumes all control. People (employees) want to feel they are part of their activity; they can’t thrive in an environment when someone else makes all the decisions for them.

The Study’s Findings

The researchers at Indiana University’s Kelley School of Business discovered some interesting results from their study. They found that those in high-stress jobs with little or no control die younger than those who have some or a lot of control.

“A lot of control” doesn’t mean not having a boss or anyone to be accountable to. It means something as simple as, for example, making your own schedule. Being part of how to set goals and accomplish tasks in the workplace is part of having control. These types of freedoms on the job are empowering to workers.

Good Stress

In fact, a useful and positive observed result was that those in high-demand positions, who also had high-control, actually flourished. Erik Gonzales Mule was the study’s lead author. He suggested that having more control can motivate workers and can breed better health. Mule points out an example: “…having pressure to work fast and use intense concentration, may result in feelings of accomplishment and mastery.”

The study included 2,400 people (half men/half women) and tracked their health for over seven years. Those in high-demand jobs with low control fared the worst. Those in high-stress positions but with high control decreased their chances of earlier death by 34%.

Job Satisfaction

How we perceive our work and workplace definitely affects our overall well-being. If we’re unhappy for the largest portion of our day, behaviors may emerge to mask the bad feelings. This can result in poor diet or overeating, alcohol or drug abuse, etc. Or, the stress can lead to depression, high blood pressure, etc.

So, perhaps it’s not literally “the job.” Maybe it’s how we are allowed to do our job. Having more control can lend to employee feelings of empowerment. Morale at work can be boosted. Instead of seeing work as “hard”, when given the freedom to participate, the work can then be seen as challenging or an opportunity to problem-solve. Those are far more positive outlooks and approaches to doing one’s job.

Personal Stress Management

When you’re at work and finding yourself too stressed out, you can always take a moment for some deep breaths, a quick walk (even around the desk), or a break outdoors. But in addition to your honed coping skills, perhaps think about your company, boss, or management. Do you feel you have low control? If so, perhaps some suggestions to human resources could affect positive change for you and your workplace.

After all, feeling good about your work—whether it pays well, is rewarding spiritually, or makes you feel like you are contributing and/or you’re appreciated—any positive feelings will be part of your best health regimen.

 

 

4 Ways to Treat Yourself at Home and Feel Rejuvenated

So often we don’t make time for ourselves; that includes taking care of our body, mind, and spirit. If you’re lucky enough to find yourself with a little free time at home, give these inner and outer beauty activities a shot.

DIY Pampering

Yes, consider yourself lucky if you have the time and means to get treated like you deserve. But if you’re life is like most—busy, complicated, and spending time taking care of others—you will need to make a conscious choice to make time for yourself. Choose an activity below and see how good you can feel by treating yourself to something just for you.

Scrub

  1. Dry Brush. Take a soft-bristled brush and make contact with your bare skin, over every inch of your body. Dry brushing will invigorate your skin. Some dermatologists suggest using a circular motion from one area to another. Other specialists recommend brushing straight in one direction as if it were a mane of hair. Regardless of your technique, the overall consensus is that ultra-fine bristles are best.

The massage definitely improves circulation. It also stimulates the lymphatic system, which will help flush toxins from the body. Exfoliation will scarf off the dead skin cells, leaving the epidermis in better shape to receive hydration, thus moister skin. After dry brushing, treat yourself to a warm shower and after, apply coconut oil to your skin.

Glow

  1. Organic Facial. Create a concoction made from fresh produce. Ingredients like lemon, strawberry, olive oil, and honey are often used in organic mask mixtures. A simple favorite is to beat an egg yolk and then add-in half a ripe avocado and blend well. Start applying at the chin, moving up towards your forehead, leaving space around your eyes and mouth. Leave on for about 20 minutes and then rinse with cool water.

After, take the inside of the avocado, the peel, and massage your face with it. The peel has oil, which contains humectants, and is a natural moisturizer. You can leave that on, or rinse off.

Chill

  1. Create a Meditation Space. You want to meditate and a quiet spot to relax, but it doesn’t exist. Yet. All you need to do is pick a spot in your home, preferably one that is not heavily trafficked. It can even be a corner or a closet! Starting with a seat—it can be a pillow, beanbag, or a blanket covering the floor. Then make whatever space is around your “seat” clean and beautiful.

Keep the lighting soft. Paint with warm colors. Decorate your space with objects that are meaningful to you. Go ahead and enjoy your creation. Hopefully, you’ll get to visit daily.

Prepare

  1. Freeze, Cook, or Bake. Being able to feed yourself a healthy, delicious food is satisfying to your entire being. Taking the time to do or make something special will go along way. One thing you can do is take your fresh produce, wash, cut, and then freeze. Slice bananas, chop spinach, cut stems off the berries—you get the picture. Your supply will be ready when you want to make that last-minute smoothie!

Look up (or check your bookmarks) for that Mediterranean dish you’ve been wanting to cook. Check out recipes for muffins, bread, or cakes. GetThrive.com has gluten-free ideas for treats and breakfast suggestions, too. Pour your joy of food into your creation. Revel in the experience when you get to eat it!

For more tips on reducing stress and making your life simpler and healthier, check out www.GetThrive.com

 

 

 

Is This The Least You’ll Weigh All Year?

According to a semi-global study, late October and early November are peak times for  “best” weights for Americans. It’s right afterwards, during holidays, that we tend to grow larger (and we don’t mean taller.)

Tighter Clothes: Post-Holiday Woes

The New England Journal of Medicine recently published its findings from a three-country study. The weight loss-and-gain of Americans, Germans, and Japanese folks were observed. Around this time of year, late fall, Americans weighed in at their lowest compared to the rest of the year.

In Germany and Japan, the results were the same. Thousands of participants were tracked using wireless scales. In all three countries, the participants’ weight rose within 10 days after Christmas Day. The heaviest day for mostly everyone in the study was around New Year’s Day.

Holiday Feasting

The common thread between all three countries is that a major holiday falls in a similar time period. Each of those holidays is celebrated with food—and lots of it. In America, of course, there’s Thanksgiving. In Germany, it’s Christmas, and in Japan, Golden Week.

Although the greatest weight gains were observed through November and December, the study also showed that there was significant weight gain around other major holidays as well.

Some Good News

It isn’t all downhill for our waistlines after the winter festivities. On a positive note, the study showed that up to half of the weight gain was lost pretty quickly after the holidays.

The Other News (…Not so Encouraging)

There’s a reason why gyms do amazing business after the first of the new year. Everyone signs up wanting to shed the extra weight they recently acquired. According to the study, the bummer news is that about half of the weight that was gained in the winter tends to stay on until summer (and sometimes beyond.)

More Self Control Needed?

If you don’t mind (or truly enjoy) being part of this statistical study, then don’t give any of this another thought. Eat, be merry, and worry about it later.

If, however, you really don’t want to gain weight during the holiday season, some serious mindful eating will need to come into play. Food celebrations will be all around you, tempting you. Mashed potatoes, stuffing, pies, rolls, egg nog, the list can and will go on… You will need to make some hard and fast choices.

Will you nibble here and there, so you won’t feel deprived? Or will you eat very healthy, smaller portions most of the time in order to indulge yourself a small bit? Or will you kick up your exercise regimen in order to burn the extra calories?

Clearly, the less you gain, the less you have to lose. Keeping that in mind, don’t stress—just try and make the healthiest decisions and stick by them. Enjoy your comforts and the people in your life. That will feed your soul well.

What Are Ancient Grains?

We read cereal boxes, snack labels, and hear about these “Ancient Grains” all over the place these days. But, what exactly are they? And, are they as good for us as these sources are claiming?

Ancient Grain Overview

There is a collection of unrefined whole grains that fit into this “ancient” category. Basically, these are grains whose roots trace back to before we kept track of time. Ancient grains have not been mutated, bred, refined, and have been left greatly unchanged over the centuries.

Many ancient civilizations such as the Greek, Egyptians, and the Aztecs used (and worshipped) these grains. The Incas considered quinoa sacred and actually named it “the mother of all grains.” Some say faro was mentioned in the Old Testament.

Not all ancient grains are gluten-free, but fortunately, most are.

Gluten-free grains include amaranth, buckwheat, chia seeds, freekeh, millet, and teff. (Oats, spelt, einkorn, faro, and Khorasan wheat “Kamut” contain gluten.)

Are Ancients Better?

It depends on how one defines better. If we’re discussing the environment, then the answer is yes, ancient grains are better. Many of them thrive with less fertilizer and irrigation, as well as lower levels of pesticides in comparison to the modern, hybrid, selectively-bred grains, like wheat.

Various health experts will debate whether ancient grains compose a healthier diet than other whole grains. Many nutritionists, however, assert that ancients provide more vitamin B, potassium, magnesium, iron, fiber, protein, and antioxidants.

The Grains, Legumes, and Nutrition Council, leading experts in this aspect of health, explains that all the whole grains are similar. However, some ancient grains are considered pseudo-cereal grains because they’re actually derived from plant seeds, and not prepared or use like “true” grains.

Are they healthier? At the very least, the benefits range from superior levels of vitamins, minerals, fiber, and a high omega-3 content. They are also an excellent form of complex carbohydrates. For the benefits and list of complex carbs click here.

Quick Guide To Ancient Grains

1) Teff. GF (Gluten-free). It’s so tiny, it can’t be processed, which is great. One cup packs in over 100mg of calcium. It’s starch resistant, high in fiber, and can help if you’re trying to shed pounds.

2) Quinoa. GF. Can be prepared in a rice-cooker. Comes in red, black, or white, and can be eaten cold like a traditional pasta salad, or warm with veggies and a lean protein. Extremely nutritious.

3) Millet. GF. It’s rich in magnesium and used in many “bread” products. It also hydrates the colon. Comes in red, white, gray, and yellow whole. Can be used whole or crushed into flour.

4) Amaranth. GF. It’s high in protein and can be used in desserts like cookies and cakes.

5) Sorghum. GF. It grows and thrives without much water. It can be utilized from a flour or syrup base, and can be used to make bread, desserts, and even beer.

6) Freekeh. GF. It’s harvested young so it tends to provide high amounts of nutrients. It’s also low in sugar carbs.

Other ancient grains include spelt, faro (also called emmer), Khorasan (also known as Kamut), and Einkorn. Sometimes these too are considered ancient grains: black barley, buckwheat, blue corn, black rice, and wild rice. (Remember, these are not all gluten-free!)

Hope this brief article on ancient grains helped answer some of your questions about this mysterious-and-healthy, old-yet-trendy food. Check back with Get Thrive soon for some delicious recipes using ancient grains, along with other healthy food tips.

 

 

More Good News About Red Wine

If you enjoy a nice glass of wine, it gets more exciting every time a new study comes out touting its benefits. Get ready to cheer once again. This time red wine may prove to correct hormonal imbalances.

Red Wine, No Sour Grapes

Besides its deliciousness to so many of our senses, red wine has shown to deliver several positive health benefits. It’s actually the compound found in the grape skins, which is naturally beneficial. It’s called resveratrol.

Resveratrol is an antioxidant. It helps cells in plants, insects, animals, and humans defend against disease.

Women and Wine

In a study just published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, the authors wrote that resveratrol intake can help restore estrogen levels.

Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) is a significant condition from which many women suffer. In fact, there are currently five to six million women in the US who’ve been stricken with this disease. Too much testosterone is produced, causing a hormonal imbalance, leading to PCOS.

PCOS is a leading cause of infertility in women.

In This Study…

Researchers conducted a double-blind test having some of the female participants take resveratrol, while the others were given a placebo. At the end of the experiment, those in the supplement-taking taking group showed to have a 23% percent drop in testosterone levels. (The placebo gals had less than a 3% decrease in testosterone levels.)

What This Means…

As further studies are conducted, it may prove that resveratrol can help moderate estrogen levels and hormone balancing. Hence, it can be used as a treatment for PCOS—and infertility caused by PCOS.

I’ll Drink to That!

Consuming extra red wine won’t necessarily provide you the amount of resveratrol with which researchers are experimenting. (In fact, overconsumption of alcohol can be dangerous or deadly.) However, one glass of red wine per day, can offer benefits far and wide throughout your body.

Many Resveratrol Benefits

Another astounding discovery about resveratrol is that it may help treat diabetes.

Resveratrol:

  • prevents insulin resistance
  • reduces oxidative stress in cells, which prevents premature aging and promotes longevity
  • protects the lining of arteries, improving blood flow
  • supports brain cells, improving mental function
  • prevents cancer cell replication, which can suppress the spread of cancer

Before taking supplements, always read up on them and discuss with your medical advisor. Cheers to the benefits of the adult red juice!

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Organic Ashwagandha Root Powder