Is Being an Older Mom a Good Thing?

Society, for centuries, has dictated that young couple meets, gets married, and directly starts a family. Times have changed, especially in the past couple of decades in the US; women are becoming moms later in life. And it turns out it’s a good thing—for mom and baby!

Hey, Old Lady!

One of the most recently discovered perks associated with having a child later in life is longevity. Women who had their first baby after the age of 25 were over 10% more likely to live until 90 years old.

Twenty-six years old is not considered “later in life” to many Americans, but globally, it may be considered old. The study from the Women’s Health Initiative examined data extracted from over 25,000 women. Another discovery from that research showed that women who had two or more children tended to outlive those who had only one.

A different study published a few years back showed even more promising results for “older” moms. That particular researched claimed that women who had children after the age of 33, were two times as likely to live to be in their late 90’s!

The Sweet Spot

Surely having your first child at the age of 44 is going to come with great risk, even with the incredible medical care we have today. Regardless, a study out of Sweden contends that the benefits outweigh the risks for the outcome of the child in cases where the mom is between 35 and 40.

The Millenium Cohort Study out of the United Kingdom also discovered advantages to older parenting. Women who had their first child between the ages of 30 and 39 had offspring who scored higher on intelligence tests than children of first-time mothers in their 20’s.

Perks for the Baby

Women who are older tend to have settled into their careers or at least have completed some form of higher education. Their children are statistically more likely to go to college.

The children are also more likely to read for pleasure and have a larger vocabulary. It could be because the moms have more time to spend with baby. Mom can devote more of herself toward nurturing early education, playtime, and other activities.

Having had more experience on earth—and socializing—older moms often have stronger support networks. They’ve had time to bond and build solid friendships. Additionally, they’re apt to have like-minded friends who’ve also waited to have their first child. Either that or their support group has already had children and can be of help and guidance.

With age, hopefully, our earning capacity increases. Statistics claim that older moms tend to have more expendable income. This works out well for mama and child. Mom can provide feasibly for baby as well as indulge in extracurricular activities.

Of course there are exceptions, but generally, mature women make healthier life choices—especially when they’re pregnant. The best outcome is a fit mom and a child whose outlook in life is positive and healthy. Surely, great moms appear at any age. But if you’re older and are concerned that that’s a detriment, you can ease your concerns… It’s all good!

 

A Connection between Alzheimer’s and Aluminum?

Aluminum found in Alzheimer’s Patients

The purpose of deodorant is to alter the scent of body odor, which is created from a mixture of sweat and bacteria. Deodorant doesn’t stop you from sweating. Antiperspirants are formulated to clog pores so less sweat escapes. Deodorants contain fragrance and/or anti-bacterial compounds. Antiperspirants contain aluminum salts.

In the late 1980s, studies began, which explored the nature of aluminum in our products and the resultant levels found in our bodies. Surely traces are found in everyone because some exposure to aluminum is inevitable since it is omnipresent in our world. Only one study, conducted in 1990, showed toxic levels in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients. That study has since been discredited because the data was provided by patient surrogates, not directly from the patients. Additionally, scientists have since hypothesized that the high levels of aluminum found in the brain may be a result of having Alzheimer’s disease. Dying cells are often unable to eliminate toxins, making them more likely to contain high levels of the metal.

Another study was published in 2002. Those researchers followed more than 4,500 people who used antiperspirants and antacids for several years. No toxic levels of aluminum or increased risk of getting Alzheimer’s was concluded. So is it safe to moderately use a product that contains aluminum salts? These reports make it appear so.

But if you’re a person who errs on the side of caution, it may not be just be the antiperspirant you want to consider. Many deodorants contain fragrance. The vast majority of chemicals in synthetic fragrances are on the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) hazardous waste list. Loopholes allow toxins such as benzenes, aldehydes, and phthaltes to be used in our cosmetics without constraint or regulation. Phthalates are hormone disrupters that are linked to cause breast cancer, reduce sperm count, onset of diabetes, obesity, and reproductive malformations.

You can also try deodorants that only use organic, plant-based compounds (no artificial fragrance.) For antiperspirant, the crystal may help, but remember, it too, may contain aluminum salts. So if you’re completely running scared at this point, you can opt to use nothing and just stay on top of it by washing your armpits with soap and water a few times a day. Don’t be afraid to sweat, it’s good for you. As for the odor, don’t sweat it (couldn’t resist the pun)—a healthy diet and proper hygiene should keep it manageable.