New Study Has Discovered Gluten’s Evil Cousin

Gluten-free is a growing diet trend that has proven to relieve intestinal suffering as well as providing other physical benefits. Unfortunately, a new study has discovered that there’s another culprit besides gluten.

What’s in Wheat?

In recent times, those who suffer from Celiac disease, have been fortunate enough to be able to identify their challenge. A simple blood test ordered by your doctor can diagnose if you have the ailment. For years, some people experienced bloating, nausea, headaches, vomiting, diarrhea, and foggy brain, and had no idea why. Gluten’s impact on digestive health was the cause.

Small Numbers, Big Problems

The percentage of people with actual Celiac is tiny. Others, however, experience similar symptoms without having the disease.  The medical community now recognizes this condition, which has been named “non-celiac gluten sensitivity.”

A new study, however, has revealed a protein in wheat that causes all kinds of trouble. Although it makes up less than 4% of proteins in wheat, amylase-tripsin Inhibitors (ATIs), they can trigger inflammation in the gut and systemically.

The Problem Protein

Research from this latest study shows that ATIs can activate the inflammation of chronic health issues. This particular protein complicates asthma, MS, lupus, arthritis, IBS, and a host of other autoimmune diseases. ATIs trigger inflammation in the gut, lymph nodes, kidneys, and even the brain.

For those non-Celiac, ATIs increase the risk of developing gluten sensitivity. It’s a frightening find; ATIs create such powerful immune responses through digestion that reactions spread to other tissues and organs in the body.

Scientists Speculate

This study has researchers explaining that gluten may not be the cause for all the awful symptoms that non-celiac gluten sensitive people experience. It’s the ATIs that contaminate the gluten.

So, certainly, a gluten-free diet is necessary for someone with celiac disease. But perhaps an ATI-free diet would benefit everyone. Eliminating this protein would reduce risk of inheriting celiac-type symptoms as well as decrease inflammation throughout the body.

Parapro Formula
Parapro Formula

Check it Out

If you feel you could benefit from removing ATIs from your diet, it is definitely doable. You’ll want to target foods that contain wheat and replace them with wheat-free selections. There are all types of different flours available that you could use to substitute when cooking and baking. Choosing fresh produce over many carbohydrates is a simple and nutritious way to make the change. Beans, legumes, and other grains are delicious choices to keep your diet gluten- and ATI-free.

Inflammation is a precursor and antagonist for chronic disease. Anyway to keep inflammation levels low is a plus.

 

Am I at Risk for Colorectal Cancer (even if I’m 25 or 30)?

Medical providers generally suggest a colonoscopy for those 50 years old and above. There has been, however, a noticeable increase in rectal cancer for those in their 20’s and 30’s. What’s more worrisome is that the increase is not due to genetics, but perhaps, rather, environmental factors.

Spiking Rates

“Someone born in 1990 would now have twice the risk of colon cancer and four times the risk of rectal cancer than at the same, had they been born in 1950,” according to researchers at the American Cancer Society and the National Cancer Institute.

Frighteningly, colorectal is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the U.S. Lung cancer is the number one cancer killer.

How Could It Possibly Be Me?

Doctors and researchers cannot absolutely pinpoint the cause of this growing trend of younger people being diagnosed with colorectal cancer. One hypothesis is that someone in his 20’s is less likely to suspect that signs and symptoms of the disease are pointing towards cancer.

Screenings for this type of cancer, as mentioned, are not recommended for those under 50, unless they’re in a high-risk group. High-risk might include someone with Crohn’s, IBS, or an Autoimmune disease such as HIV. And because younger people aren’t paying attention to symptoms, and not getting tested, often the colorectal cancer is finally detected at more advanced stages.

Not having access to health insurance can also thwart someone from getting screenings or seeing a specialist.

Better if You’re Older

Because of suggested screenings, rectal cancer in those over 50 is often found at an early stage. Back in 1985, approximately 225 people out of 100,000 (over age 50) were diagnosed with colorectal cancer. As of 2013, those rates changed to 116 out of 100,000.  That’s a significant drop in numbers.

Additionally, when a 55-year old notices blood in her stool, she apt to question its origin more than a 25 year-old would. Often, blood found on toilet tissue is mistaken as a sign of bleeding hemorrhoids. Obviously we shouldn’t panic over certain signs, but there may be some that are worth discussing with a physician.

Some symptoms are:

-unusual sustained bloating

-unintended weight loss

-chronic constipation

-blood in stools

Keeping Calm

Yes, newer studies and data are showing increased numbers in younger people diagnosed with colorectal cancer. However, the truth is that the rate of people in their 20’s getting the disease has only increased by two cases for every 200,000 people per year. In 2013, the research showed that approximately 8 out of 100,000 adults under 50 were diagnosed positive for the cancer.

And although the colorectal cancer rates are rising slightly in the younger set, the mortality rate has not increased. Younger people are not dying at higher rates. It’s still fairly uncommon to be diagnosed if you’re under 50, but the rates are rising—and quickly.

Lifestyle, Environment, and Behavior

There is an increased risk of getting any cancer, amongst any age group, when “healthy, mindful living” isn’t part of one’s habitual daily life. Sure, there are folks who smoke, are obese, never exercise, and never get cancer. But, that might be called a “fluke” or “getting lucky.”

How we treat our bodies reflect how well it treats us. And sadly, there, too, are folks who get diagnosed with cancer who’ve taken great care of themselves all along. That unlucky roll of the die is most likely attributable to the toxins in our air, water, and soil.

Regardless, you can decrease your risk, overall, if you are mindful of the foods you eat, the air your breather, the water your drink, and your body’s stress levels. High fiber, low fat, organic foods can help keep your digestive system functioning at optimum capacity. Daily exercise also lends to expelling toxins, increasing oxygen-rich blood, and experiencing less tension and stress. All of these behaviors can certainly keep you healthier than if you didn’t practice them.

Sources:

http://www.clickorlando.com/health/born-in-the-90s-your-colon-cancer-risk-could-be-rising

https://www.cancer.org/cancer/colon-rectal-cancer/detection-diagnosis-staging/signs-and-symptoms.html

http://chicago.cbslocal.com/2017/03/01/doctors-warn-of-colon-rectal-cancers-spike-in-young-adults/