New Study Has Discovered Gluten’s Evil Cousin

Gluten-free is a growing diet trend that has proven to relieve intestinal suffering as well as providing other physical benefits. Unfortunately, a new study has discovered that there’s another culprit besides gluten.

What’s in Wheat?

In recent times, those who suffer from Celiac disease, have been fortunate enough to be able to identify their challenge. A simple blood test ordered by your doctor can diagnose if you have the ailment. For years, some people experienced bloating, nausea, headaches, vomiting, diarrhea, and foggy brain, and had no idea why. Gluten’s impact on digestive health was the cause.

Small Numbers, Big Problems

The percentage of people with actual Celiac is tiny. Others, however, experience similar symptoms without having the disease.  The medical community now recognizes this condition, which has been named “non-celiac gluten sensitivity.”

A new study, however, has revealed a protein in wheat that causes all kinds of trouble. Although it makes up less than 4% of proteins in wheat, amylase-tripsin Inhibitors (ATIs), they can trigger inflammation in the gut and systemically.

The Problem Protein

Research from this latest study shows that ATIs can activate the inflammation of chronic health issues. This particular protein complicates asthma, MS, lupus, arthritis, IBS, and a host of other autoimmune diseases. ATIs trigger inflammation in the gut, lymph nodes, kidneys, and even the brain.

For those non-Celiac, ATIs increase the risk of developing gluten sensitivity. It’s a frightening find; ATIs create such powerful immune responses through digestion that reactions spread to other tissues and organs in the body.

Scientists Speculate

This study has researchers explaining that gluten may not be the cause for all the awful symptoms that non-celiac gluten sensitive people experience. It’s the ATIs that contaminate the gluten.

So, certainly, a gluten-free diet is necessary for someone with celiac disease. But perhaps an ATI-free diet would benefit everyone. Eliminating this protein would reduce risk of inheriting celiac-type symptoms as well as decrease inflammation throughout the body.

Parapro Formula
Parapro Formula

Check it Out

If you feel you could benefit from removing ATIs from your diet, it is definitely doable. You’ll want to target foods that contain wheat and replace them with wheat-free selections. There are all types of different flours available that you could use to substitute when cooking and baking. Choosing fresh produce over many carbohydrates is a simple and nutritious way to make the change. Beans, legumes, and other grains are delicious choices to keep your diet gluten- and ATI-free.

Inflammation is a precursor and antagonist for chronic disease. Anyway to keep inflammation levels low is a plus.

 

Your Teen’s Brain and Marijuana

Currently, more than half of the states in America legally allow the use of Marijuana in some form. The medical community has embraced the many benefits it can assist with alleviating pain and/or reducing disease in the body. Additionally, research has shown that in adults, marijuana can be helpful to the brain. However, when it comes to your teen’s brain and marijuana, the results may show differently.

The Teen Formula Book
The Teen Formula Book

Medical or Merry Marijuana?

Whatever your stance on marijuana use, the fact is that it’s available legally and illegally. According to Governing.com, “Thirty states and the District of Columbia currently have laws broadly legalizing marijuana in some form.” And, as per an article in the New England Journal of Medicine, “Marijuana is the most commonly used “illicit” drug in the United States.”

So, whether it’s for medicinal or recreational purposes, there’s clearly a demand.

Regardless, it’s been widely recognized that marijuana may be an effective treatment for symptoms of various medical conditions. Some of them are:

  • Glaucoma
  • Nausea from chemotherapy drugs
  • Loss of appetite (improve appetite in patients with AIDS or anorexia nervosa)
  • Inflammation (reduce inflammation from rheumatoid arthritis, ulcerative colitis, Parkinson’s, and many other diseases)
  • Chronic pain
  • Epilepsy
  • Multiple Sclerosis

Your Adult Brain and Cannabinoids

Aside benefitting symptoms of clinical conditions, marijuana has also been proven to have neuroprotective agencies. Cannabinoids actually create new brain cell production and growth.

As we age, neurogenesis (the process of growing new brain cells) slows down. Some results of poor adult neurogenesis are: anxiety, stress, and depression. Marijuana aids in the growth of new cells in the hippocampus. This may be one reason why it has shown to be successful in treating particular mood disorders. 

The THC in marijuana has revealed to be a powerful antioxidant for the brain. Because of its neuroprotective properties, it can help clean away brain plaque. The build up of beta-amyloid plaque is one cause of Alzheimer’s disease. Along with Alzheimer’s, other neurodegenerative diseases like MS, Lou Gehrig’s, and Parkinson’s can also benefit from cannabis treatment.

Research has shown that marijuana also aids in attacking cancer cells. Conversely, it does not harm the healthy cells. Studies have provided evidence that cannabis may reduce tumors in the brain. Along with utilizing other therapies, marijuana treatment may halt or reverse the progression of some cancers.

Say NO to Brain Trauma and Sports

Most of the research and statistics compiled in regards to the benefits of your brain and marijuana is comprised mainly of adults. Your teen’s brain and marijuana may not react the same as we’ve discussed thus far. On the other hand, it may, but there isn’t nearly enough research or credibility to prove that it does. So, keep in mind, in this section we are sourcing cases solely involving adults.

Henceforth, laboratory studies have shown that cannabis may protect the brain from trauma. Research shows that damage to the brain from a force, a blow, carbon monoxide poisoning, and even stroke may be reduced due to marijuana use. Most importantly, cannabis helps reduce inflammation.

A concussion is trauma to the brain. As we are aware, many athletes are in danger of, or prone to, getting concussions. The antioxidants in cannabis plants can provide protection from neural inflammation. (And a concussion encompasses inflammation of the brain.) There are researchers who believe that certain properties of marijuana may assist in the brain recovering and repairing itself. The CBD in the marijuana may even be helpful—proactively!

CHECK THIS OUT: Evidently, the U.S. government currently has a patent on a non-psychoactive CBD. The intent would be to utilize it as a neuroprotective element—one that would limit brain damage after an accident involving head trauma. That’s a pretty cool bet on the healing properties of marijuana.

A Teen’s Brain and Marijuana is a Complicated Issue

For as much research and speculation, it is still not absolute that marijuana kills brain cells. In fact, as we learned for adults, cannabis helps create new ones. But, with teens the picture is different. The main reason is because the adolescent and teen brain is not fully developed. Most noteworthy, the rational part of the brain isn’t often developed until the age of 25.

The actual use of marijuana may or may not have any detrimental disturbances to the brain directly. Although, more research points to the concern that cannabis may affect the teen brain negatively. Brain-imaging studies sway experts towards the principle that “the teen’s brain and marijuana are not a positive combination.” 

Naturally, our nerve cells manufacture cannabinoids, from birth. These cannabinoids play a huge part in how the brain regulates our everyday habits such as: sleeping, eating, remembering, moving around, and our emotions.

When “outside” cannabis is introduced into the still-developing brain, it can create significant changes in those everyday habits. This is worrisome for medical experts because the brain can become wired in an unbalanced fashion in regards to those processes. This doesn’t look like a plus for marijuana teen use.

More Complications for Teens, Including Safety and Learning

It’s the young brain’s inability to make rational decisions that causes the most immediate danger. The prominent negative effects of short-term marijuana use by teens are:

  • impaired coordination (driving accidents, risk of increased injuries)
  • impaired short-term memory (prohibits learning and retaining new information)
  • practice of poor judgment (risk-taking behavior: unprotected sex, reckless driving, illegal activity, pushing the limits)

Part of the brain’s development during the teen years is the strengthening of executive function. One such function would be emotional self-control. Marijuana use may impede this strengthening process. Thus, the youngster may not develop this self-control mechanism as nature intended.

Aside from safety concerns, marijuana-use may plague learning. When under the influence of marijuana, there may be a heightened sense of creativity and flow. That’s terrific. However, it’s been proven that additionally, attention, learning, and memory become impaired. That’s not so fantastic.

It’s tough to build brainpower when the mind is still developing and besieged by a mind-altering substance.

A Teen’s Future…

Your teen’s brain and marijuana may not impact his/her future in a negative way. There are numerous studies that show very-little to no-changes in the brain later in life. And, there are many adults who can attest to having smoked pot as a teen and seem none-the-worse today for having partaken.

However, some of the studies that show negative long-term effects of young-age, marijuana-use are based on heavy, habitual use, starting as adolescents into adulthood. Those are real and can be serious. Some of those effects include:

  • addiction to marijuana or other substances
  • diminished lifetime achievements
  • motor vehicle accidents
  • anxiety and/or depression
  • chronic bronchitis

The brain is a phenomenally interesting and complex organ. It guides our body from head to toe. Its processes are affected by thousands of neurons, nerves, thoughts, cells, chemicals, and countless other elements. The bottom line is, “How much do you respect your brain?”

For adults with any semblance of gratitude for life, we bow up to the brain. And according to most sources, marijuana is not directly hurting this precious organ. So, using cannabis or not, as an adult, is a personal choice. But, when it comes to teens, their brains don’t have the ability yet to help them make the most appropriate choices. It has to be up to the adults to teach the young the facts. No one said it would be easy…

Check into Get Thrive when you’re looking for guidance or tips on best health for your family. Also, if this article resonates with you, you may want to  have a look at Dr. Campbell’s best selling book, The Teen Formula: A Parent’s Guide To Helping Your Child Avoid Substance Abuse HERE available in paperback or on Kindle.

Thank you for joining us today!

 

Sources:

https://herb.co/marijuana/news/7-ways-cannabis-great-brain

https://www.therecoveryvillage.com/marijuana-addiction/marijuana-and-concussions/#gref

https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/what-pot-really-does-to-the-teen-brain/

http://www.governing.com/gov-data/state-marijuana-laws-map-medical-recreational.html

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4827335/

https://www.urmc.rochester.edu/encyclopedia/content.aspx?ContentTypeID=1&ContentID=3051

Red Wine is Good For You, Isn’t It?

Red wine is good for us, or at least that’s what we tell ourselves after scanning articles which boast its health benefits.  This fuzzy knowledge of the scientific facts, allows us to indulge without guilt.  “Red wine has health benefits”, we whisper to ourselves, therefore I can have my third glass, safe in the understanding its good for me, or is it?

Do we really know the facts when it comes to the health benefits of red wine?

The answer is often mumbled incoherently, “yeah, red wine is good for you heart…. blah, blah, blah”.  One of the most famous papers to date was written by Professor Mukamal, MD, MPH from Harvard Medical School.  Mukamal observed lifestyle and dietary influences in men and women in their fifties, focusing particularly on red wine consumption.  A rough summary of this report suggests that men who drink a maximum of two glasses of red wine (5 ounces per glass), with their evening meal were 30% less likely to suffer from heart disease.  W omen who drink one glass of red per night are 23% less likely to have heart disease.

Are other influencers affecting the scientific benefits of red wine?

A Mediterranean diet is crammed with fruit, vegetables and olive oil, all rich in polyphenols (most notably Resveratrol).  The antioxidant properties of polyphenols protect the body’s tissues, forming barriers against cancers, disease, and inflammation.  Resveratrol has shown preventive effects against high calorie diets in laboratory mice, slowing weight gain.  It is possible that the health statistics of red wine have been influenced by certain diets.

Antioxidants are plentiful in the skin of red grapes and red berried fruits

Grapes like Malbec or Pinot Noir, grown in the cooler climates of France, have a higher density of resveratrol, which may explain the famous terminology, “French Paradox.”  This irony refers to the traditional high-fat French diet, accompanied by L’Art de Vivre (the art of living with a glass of red in your hand).  Emphasizing this fact, the French have the lowest heart disease rates in the western world, though this may be changing with the introduction of fast/convenience food, which is altering the traditional French diet.  With all the scientific health research behind red wine, scientists are vague on the exact facts. Using words like ‘may’ or ‘suggests’ does not fully support the scientific research.

QQC can help reap the benefits of red wine

  • Quality: choose a wine from small producers, who use fewer pesticides, like a French biodynamic or organic red wine.
  • Quantity: ditch the weekend binge drinking, which can higher the risk of cancer, in favor of a small glass (or 2) of quality red with your evening meal.
  • Common Sense: too much of a good thing, becomes bad, so eat fruit and vegetables and have an active lifestyle.

Next time you justify downing more than a few glasses, don’t use health benefits and science as an excuse to drink more.  Use common sense to drink just the right amount and raise a glass for good health.

For more tips on overall health improvement, check out GetThrive.com!

 

Resources

French Paradox

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1768013/

Kenneth J. Mukamal, M.D.

https://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/arcr352/250-259.htm

Organic and Biodynamic wine

http://www.drinkmemag.com/unearthing-the-organic-biodynamic-world-of-bordeaux/

Tired Too Often? It’s More than a Gut Feeling

If you’re tired all the time…

your condition may be linked to your gut. A new study shows a link between Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) and gut bacteria.

How Ya Doin’?

Do you wake up feeling exhausted? Are you extremely tired after doing even the most mundane tasks? You sleep, take naps, and yet you can’t shake the sensation of tiredness. You could be suffering from Chronic Fatigue Syndrome. And it could be caused by inflammation and a bacterial imbalance in your gut.

Getting Diagnosed

Here’s the thing. Many doctors have difficulty diagnosing CFS. It can also be referred to as myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME). There is no specific blood test or easily read biomarkers. Psychological factors, viruses, and infections can cause extreme tiredness. To deem one’s condition with a “chronic” label is a serious diagnosis.

According to the Mayo Clinic website, CFS has nine signs and symptoms. The first, of course, is fatigue. The others include: enlarged lymph nodes in neck or armpits, unexplained muscle pain, random joint pain, and an unusual headache. Other symptoms are: un-refreshing sleep, exhaustion lasting more than a full day after exercise, loss of memory, and a sore throat. You can see why other diagnoses would be considered first.

What are the Causes?

Until now, doctors or scientists who have diagnosed CFS, have been perplexed about exact causes. Some believe certain viruses might trigger the syndrome. Perhaps an impaired immune system leaves individuals susceptible to CFS. Hormonal imbalances have also been studied as a possible cause offsetting the condition.

Finally, a recent study offers more in the way of reason. Your gut bacteria and inflammatory agents in the blood may cause CFS.

Researchers at Cornell University studied stool samples of the 77 participants. Forty-eight had already been diagnosed with CFS, while the other 39 were perfectly healthy. The study, published in the journal Microbiome, showed that those with CFS had less bacterial diversity in the gut. They also had markers showing inflammation. One theory was that “leaky gut” allowed bacteria from the intestines to enter the bloodstream.

What to Do?

As far as the new research shows, the indicators of imbalance in gut bacteria may now be used as one way to test for CFS. Maureen Hanson, a professor involved in the study explained, “Our work demonstrates that the gut bacterial microbiome in chronic fatigue syndrome patients isn’t normal.” It was an indicator in 83 % of the participants in the study. This is a great breakthrough for those who advocate the condition isn’t just “psychological.”

Restoring the gut microbiome balance may be a path to treating CFS. A variety of probiotics may help along with a change in diet. Exploring ways to get your gut bacteria back to healthy levels is a great start. Discuss options with your doctor or naturopath. With this new evidence and proper treatment, your fatigue may no longer remain chronic.

For more information on maintaining balance in the body and mind, check out www.GetThrive.com

 

How Can Air Pollution Cause Brain Problems?

It’s bad

We all know that air pollution is bad for our health. But just how bad? Air pollution is actually linked with some pretty serious and shocking health hazards and risks.

Air pollution isn’t just bad for the lungs; it’s also bad for the brain. How, you might ask? While air pollution causes an inflammatory response in the lungs, it also causes the same response in the brain. The particles we breathe in are deposited in the lining of our lungs, causing inflammation.

For example

When you get dust particles or anything in your eyes, your eyes become red, itchy, and inflamed. The same response happens when polluted particles enter the lining in our lungs. Air pollution causes irritation, resulting in inflammation in our lungs.

In fact, heart attacks and strokes are both linked to inflammation of blood vessels. When hazardous air particles enter our lungs and cause inflammation, then there is cause for concern. Therefore, there is a link between air pollution and heart attacks and silent strokes.

So what can we do?

Lowering our risk of brain disease and heart attacks ultimately means lowering our exposure to air pollution. Air pollution is clearly bad for brain health, increases risk for heart attack and stroke, and is even linked to a decrease in cognitive functions.

The theory makes sense

Decreasing your exposure to air pollution is the secret to improving your health. Easier said than done, right? How can we do this other than avoiding our environment each day? This just may mean relocating to a rural area or suburb, avoiding busy or heavily traveled roadways and highways.

For more information on how air pollution can affect your health, or for other health related facts and tips, subscribe to THRIVE at Getthrive.com.

 

 

Are Autoimmune Diseases Linked to Dementia?

Researchers set out to understand if there is any link to autoimmune disorders and eventual increased risk for dementia. With an estimated number of approximately 5-million Americans having dementia, it’s no wonder scientists are scrambling for causes, preventions, and cures. One recent study sheds light on some valuable connections regarding possible pre-cursors to the future onset of dementia.

Linking Increased Risks

The findings from a study on autoimmune diseases and dementia were published March 2017 in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health. Data was collected from almost 2 million adults who had been hospitalized, at least once, for an autoimmune disease. The analysis revealed that the risk of subsequent dementia was indeed increased.

Specifically, the risk was more elevated for those who suffered from lupus, rheumatoid arthritis, and multiple sclerosis. The study, based on medical data, cannot claim a definitive cause-and-effect element between autoimmune disorders and dementia. However, as described, there is an association between those with an autoimmune status and having a future increased risk of a vascular dementia diagnosis. Additionally, this information may assist health practitioners in realizing an individual’s possible coexistence of the two disorders.

What is the Common Link?

Both autoimmune disorders and dementia (including Alzheimer’s) have, to date, shown biomarkers for inflammation. Many factors contribute to inflammation in the body and the brain. An inflammatory response can be triggered by: diet, toxins, bacteria, viruses, stress, just to name a few catalysts.

Inflammation occurs when our body “naturally” aims to curb any perceived threat to our immune system. Current research reveals that a large number of inflammation markers exist in those diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. In fact, the same exists for those with autoimmune disorders. Both inflammation and abnormal immune activity are significant in degenerative brain diseases.

How to Keep Inflammation at a Minimum

Our body’s immune system is geared to respond to protect itself. So, when something intrudes, it will attack. The challenge for today’s good health is that we have many intruders, some of which we don’t see coming, (or have the ability to curtail.) Some on this list are air and water pollution, pesticides, mold, and viruses.

Other inflammatory triggers, conversely, can be avoided or minimized. These would include: stress, poor diet, food allergies, lack of sleep, lack of exercise, and lack of nature. We do have some ability to make adjustments or lifestyle changes that may help ensure keeping inflammation levels low.

What’s on the Good List?

It may feel or sound repetitive, but it’s no coincidence that the same checklists of beneficial practices appear on most good-health lists. Here they are again as a reminder:

Eat a nutritious and balanced diet. Whole foods, nuts, vegetables, fruits, beans, and seeds are most beneficial. Buy organic when possible, or grow them yourself. Fish is fantastic for the omegas we need. Lean protein, like turkey or chicken are fine, free-range. Cage-free and/or organic eggs are healthy. Indulge in good fats such as avocados, coconut oil, flaxseed, etc.

AVOID: processed foods, especially meats; sugar (corn syrup, fructose, and all “diet” chemical sugar substitutes.) You may have wheat or gluten sensitivity, which can cause inflammation as well. Alcohol is best in moderation.

– Sleep well, every night, whenever possible. Do you know that the brain actually “cleans itself” when we sleep? Brain waves from sleep trigger a cleaning flow. The glymphatic system is a brain “washing” system that helps reduce inflammation from toxins and other hormonal imbalances.

Exercise daily, sometimes more aerobically. After exercise, it’s been proven that neuroplasticity is increased for hours. The brain becomes stimulated and synapses and neurons go wild. Besides the brain gain, inflammation may be reduced from the stress-relief that exercise provides.

Play brain games. Have challenging, thought-provoking conversations. Read interesting non-fiction. Do crossword puzzles, jumbles, and sudoku. Make your mind work.

If these areas of health are important to you, it may be worth continuing your research and best-health practices. You may always refer to GetThrive for current reader-friendly health information for you and your loved ones.

Sources:
Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health, March 2017

https://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/21/health/dementia-rates-united-states.html?_r=0

http://jonlieffmd.com/blog/inflammation-and-dementia

http://jech.bmj.com/content/early/2017/01/30/jech-2016-207809

Is Pot Better For Pain Than Pills?

Medical marijuana has a wealth of benefits for people with pain. Although doctors prescribe opioid medication for extreme discomfort, a recent study showed that patients actually preferred cannabis. Does this mean pot works better?

Weed-ing out Some Facts

Cannabis (in plant form) and cannabis oil offer health merits such as helping with glaucoma, pain management, and improving appetite.

Cannabidiol Extract (CBD) is a chemical compound in marijuana, but without the THC. THC is psychoactive; CBD oil doesn’t get you high. Cannabidiol essential oil has an incredibly long list of health advantages without undesirable side effects.

Pain relief and decreased inflammation are the primary positive yields from CBD oil use. Approximately 17 states across the U.S. have approved this essential oil as a valid, medicinal treatment. The British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology published a 2013 study that showed CBD oil’s benefits are linked to:

  • Reduced nausea and vomiting
  • Reduced risk of seizures
  • Battling psychotic disorders
  • Reduced inflammation and battling against inflammatory diseases
  • Lower risk of Alzheimer’s and dementia onset
  • Reduced growth of cancer cells
  • Reduced anxiety and depression

Recent Research

The University of British Columbia and the University of Victoria recently conducted a study. The Canadian research found that patients prefer using cannabis over opioid pills to treat chronic pain and mental health issues.

Over 250 patients were surveyed regarding their use of cannabis for pain. Over 60 percent reported that they used cannabis instead of other prescribed medicines, which included opioids such as hydrocodone and oxycodone. One of the main reasons they preferred using cannabis was because they felt they had better symptom management.

They also reported that cannabis had fewer side effects than the prescription pills. Overall, the response from the participants using cannabis (instead of opioids) was that “they felt safer.”

Cannabis IS Safer

The sale of opioid-based pain prescriptions quadrupled from 1999 to 2014. According to the Center for Disease Control (CDC), the leading cause of unintentional death amongst Americans is prescription pill and heroin overdose.

It’s also true that doctors have been careful not to overprescribe in the past couple of years. Originally, the pharmaceutical company claimed that opioid-based medicines were not addictive. Since the drug company lost a major lawsuit, and we see the epidemic-numbers of abuse and addiction, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency finally decided to step in. Thankfully, the market is shrinking, and this year, manufacturing of opioids will be reduced by 25%.

According to the U.S. DEA drug sheet, “no deaths from marijuana overdose have ever been recorded.”

Certainly, a person’s ability to make safe choices while on cannabis can be impaired. There have been deaths related to the behavioral effects from marijuana use. But as far as dying directly from an overdose of pot, it would be almost impossible. A 2006 report in American Scientist claimed that in order to cause a fatality, a person would need to smoke or eat 1,000 times the usual dose of cannabis.

This material does not condone nor deter any person from using cannabis or taking prescription opioids. It is a personal decision (made with your health care provider) what course of treatment is best when you are in dire pain. And of course, there are other paths of treatment as well. To read more about this and other topical health care articles, check out GetThrive.com.

Sources:

http://www.upi.com/Health_News/2017/02/27/Study-finds-patients-choosing-cannabis-over-opioids/7961488207322/?st_rec=3901489425129

https://getthrive.com/health-benefits-of-chemical-composition-of-marijuana/

https://getthrive.com/vote-alternate-forms-pain-management/

https://supplementpolice.com/cbd-oil/

http://www.cnn.com/2015/12/18/health/drug-overdose-deaths-2014/index.html

http://naturalsociety.com/dea-slash-opioid-production-2017-5885/

https://www.dea.gov/druginfo/drug_data_sheets/Marijuana.pdf

 

 

Weight-Loss Tips Not For Dummies

If you’re serious about losing weight, you’ll want to be smart about your plan. If your goal is weight-loss and keeping it off, then you need to be smart. Read on then, for proven, “Not for Dummies”, expert tips to help you attain your goal.

It’s Your Loss

So often we see in the media, people touting their magnificent new figure, sans 40-100 or more pounds than they were previously. But before long, oops! The weight-loss turns back to weight gain. Why?

A true “good” diet is a habitual regimen of healthful, mindful eating.

The main reason why people’s weight fluctuate so greatly is because they go on a diet. “Going on a diet” connotes temporary, extreme changes in eating habits. If you go, you eventually come back—like “going on a vacation.” You’re enthusiastic to go, but the return trip turns out to be a downer.

Forget the Quick Weight-Loss Fix

Once you “go off the diet,” you generally gain back the weight.

The only way to lose pounds and keep them off is by adopting a particular lifestyle. That lifestyle includes a balanced, nutritional, whole-foods based, forever-diet—along with regular exercise, and proper rest.  Period.

The Only Worthy Tips are the Smart Ones

There’s so much information to filter through and digest; it’s surprising we even have any motivation after we’re done researching diets. The reality and scientific truth is that no gimmick or “trending” diet will give you desired results if your goal is to keep the weight off.

Healthy weight reduction and maintenance is possible with a commitment to a smart plan.

Smarty-Pants Tips

Weight loss is not about merely cutting calories. It’s about providing your body with nutrients and reducing inflammation in your body.

Focusing on those two factors will naturally shed pounds with ease.

How do you provide nutrients? The only way is through ingesting non-processed, whole foods. Vegetables, fruits, and lean proteins will provide you with vitamins and minerals.

The way your body absorbs nutrients is to combine them with fat-soluble foods. This means you need to eat “good fats.” Here are some yummy examples:

  • blueberries with walnuts
  • carrots with hummus (garbanzo beans, good)
  • sweet-potato chips with guacamole (avocado being the good fat)
  • almond butter on a brown rice cake
  • a teaspoon of flaxseed oil in your berry smoothie
  • avocado oil in the pan with your scrambled eggs
  • asparagus with your salmon (omega-3 fatty acid rich)

I bet you’re getting the picture!

Tipping the Inflammation Scale

If your body is experiencing inflammation externally, you know it. You can see redness or swelling. Internally, you really don’t know if you’re inflamed until you feel lousy or experience pain, or you get diagnosed with a disease.

Inflammation, clearly, is not a good thing. In order to decrease it and help you on your weight-loss plan, there are certain foods you might consider removing from your diet. Inflammatory foods include:

  • wheat, gluten, and casein
  • dairy
  • processed and cured meats
  • soy
  • processed grains
  • sugar
  • sugar
  • sugar

Awww, Sugar Sugar

Yep, sugar mentioned more than once was not a typo. Sugar in the form of granulated or powdered sugar, high fructose corn syrup, corn syrup, and fructose is unacceptable in more than minuscule amounts if you want to lose weight, keep it off, and have a healthy body.

And, forget the artificial sweeteners. They are equally or almost worst. Read why here.

Here’s the Skinny on Weight-Loss

Regardless of the propaganda circulating by the sugar, wheat, and corn industries, “no dummies” do not fall into that trap. The truth is that those ingredients cause inflammation. If you want to lose weight, you need to say bye-bye to them for a while, if not, your lifetime.

It may sound grim, but the reality is that’s it’s a challenge and can be fun.

Don’t starve yourself by any means.

Start out your day with a nutritious breakfast. A smoothie that includes berries, protein (like a nut butter), fresh spinach or kale, a squeeze of lemon juice, and a bit of almond or coconut milk will fill you up and get your digestive system and brain into forward gear.

You can snack on any of the foods mentioned above. Your lunch and dinner should consist of at least half a plate of veggies and the rest with lean protein and good grains and fats. Make herbs and spices your best cooking friends too—they will add flavor and also help reduce inflammation.

Drink tons of water throughout the day and try to get at least eight hours of sleep per night. Toss in a bit of daily exercise, and you will start losing weight before you know it. Maintain a healthy diet, and you’ll keep those pounds off, and you will feel better than you ever have!

Ask a friend to join you on your positive eating challenge. If you need more support, there are terrific programs already set up to get you started. Restart TM offers groups with trained coaches to help with mindful eating. Arbonne offers a 30-day healthy living package with nutritional supplements and professional support. You can always check out other weight-loss and positive health-affective diets on www.GetThrive.com