Healing Takes Time—And a Nutritionally Boosted Diet

Proper nutrition is always best practice. But when you’re wounded, it’s imperative that you pay extra attention to your diet if you want to heal more quickly. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics has recently come forward with updated dietary recommendations.

Eat Well, Feel Well Sooner

On a daily basis, the foods you choose to ingest play a factor in how you feel. But if you are hurt and your body is wounded, you actually need to up your nutritional game.

Most wounds, when they remain uninfected, heal pretty quickly, especially if they are minor cuts and scrapes. However, wounds that are, large, too close to bone, or become badly infected will require medical care.

Your body will require boosted nourishment for healing the injury. Nutrients can be depleted from weeping wounds. In order to promote healing from any serious wound, your body will need an increase in vitamins, minerals, proteins, and hydration.

Healthy Healing Dietary Recommendations

The nutritional “wound healing” recommendations of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics are fairly similar to what most health experts suggest. Here is an overview:

1 ) Eat an ample amount of calories, proportioned properly between proteins, vegetables, fruits, dairy, grains, and good fats. Your dinner plate should be half-filled with green vegetables. A quarter should be protein. The last quarter should be shared with good carbs and good fats.

Some good veggies: broccoli, kale, spinach, Brussels sprouts, and asparagus

Some good proteins: fish, chicken, turkey, tofu, grass-fed beef, and lentils.

Some good carbs: brown rice, quinoa, beets, sweet potatoes and carrots.

Some good fats: milks: coconut, almond, soy, and rice; flaxseed oil, avocado, and nuts

2) Aim for at least 80 grams of protein. (20-30 grams each meal plus 10 or more for each snack.)

3) Stay hydrated. Drink water, milk: almond, soy, coconut, or rice, fresh-squeezed juices. Avoid caffeine and alcohol as they tend to dehydrate.

4) If you’re diabetic, work with a dietician to keep your blood sugar levels controlled.

Vitamin Recommendations

The Cleveland Clinic proposes upping your intake of protein, vitamin A and C, as well as Zinc to promote wound healing. Here are some suggestions for foods high in those specific vitamin and mineral content.

Vitamin A: Dark green, leafy veggies, liver, fortified cereals, carrots, and orange and yellow veggies.

Vitamin C: Berries, citrus fruits, broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage

Zinc: Beef, kidney beans, oysters, shrimp

For other updates on best health practices, check out www.GetThrive.com

 

 

What Are Ancient Grains?

We read cereal boxes, snack labels, and hear about these “Ancient Grains” all over the place these days. But, what exactly are they? And, are they as good for us as these sources are claiming?

Ancient Grain Overview

There is a collection of unrefined whole grains that fit into this “ancient” category. Basically, these are grains whose roots trace back to before we kept track of time. Ancient grains have not been mutated, bred, refined, and have been left greatly unchanged over the centuries.

Many ancient civilizations such as the Greek, Egyptians, and the Aztecs used (and worshipped) these grains. The Incas considered quinoa sacred and actually named it “the mother of all grains.” Some say faro was mentioned in the Old Testament.

Not all ancient grains are gluten-free, but fortunately, most are.

Gluten-free grains include amaranth, buckwheat, chia seeds, freekeh, millet, and teff. (Oats, spelt, einkorn, faro, and Khorasan wheat “Kamut” contain gluten.)

Are Ancients Better?

It depends on how one defines better. If we’re discussing the environment, then the answer is yes, ancient grains are better. Many of them thrive with less fertilizer and irrigation, as well as lower levels of pesticides in comparison to the modern, hybrid, selectively-bred grains, like wheat.

Various health experts will debate whether ancient grains compose a healthier diet than other whole grains. Many nutritionists, however, assert that ancients provide more vitamin B, potassium, magnesium, iron, fiber, protein, and antioxidants.

The Grains, Legumes, and Nutrition Council, leading experts in this aspect of health, explains that all the whole grains are similar. However, some ancient grains are considered pseudo-cereal grains because they’re actually derived from plant seeds, and not prepared or use like “true” grains.

Are they healthier? At the very least, the benefits range from superior levels of vitamins, minerals, fiber, and a high omega-3 content. They are also an excellent form of complex carbohydrates. For the benefits and list of complex carbs click here.

Quick Guide To Ancient Grains

1) Teff. GF (Gluten-free). It’s so tiny, it can’t be processed, which is great. One cup packs in over 100mg of calcium. It’s starch resistant, high in fiber, and can help if you’re trying to shed pounds.

2) Quinoa. GF. Can be prepared in a rice-cooker. Comes in red, black, or white, and can be eaten cold like a traditional pasta salad, or warm with veggies and a lean protein. Extremely nutritious.

3) Millet. GF. It’s rich in magnesium and used in many “bread” products. It also hydrates the colon. Comes in red, white, gray, and yellow whole. Can be used whole or crushed into flour.

4) Amaranth. GF. It’s high in protein and can be used in desserts like cookies and cakes.

5) Sorghum. GF. It grows and thrives without much water. It can be utilized from a flour or syrup base, and can be used to make bread, desserts, and even beer.

6) Freekeh. GF. It’s harvested young so it tends to provide high amounts of nutrients. It’s also low in sugar carbs.

Other ancient grains include spelt, faro (also called emmer), Khorasan (also known as Kamut), and Einkorn. Sometimes these too are considered ancient grains: black barley, buckwheat, blue corn, black rice, and wild rice. (Remember, these are not all gluten-free!)

Hope this brief article on ancient grains helped answer some of your questions about this mysterious-and-healthy, old-yet-trendy food. Check back with Get Thrive soon for some delicious recipes using ancient grains, along with other healthy food tips.

 

 

Doctors “Prescribing” Fresh Foods From Food Banks

Food Banks in the US are stocking more nutritious foods for their clientele.

These organizations across America help the homeless and those with low incomes to eat affordably or for free. Food banks, in association with local farmers, are offering more fresh produce these days. And doctors are collaborating with food banks, prescribing fruits and vegetables to improve overall health.

Feeding America

Feeding America is a nonprofit organization who took a survey of 200 food banks. They discovered that one-third of households participating in food banks have at least one member who is diabetic. More than 50 percent have a member with high blood pressure.

When questioned, 55 percent of the families responded that they would love to have fruits and veggies, but felt they couldn’t afford them. They may get their wish soon. Over 30 food banks in the Midwest refuse to accept “sweets” into their supplies. They are trying to carry healthier foods like lean proteins and produce as opposed to grains and empty-calorie foods.

Doctors Partnering

Chicago-area clinics, for example, have hosted events where truckloads of fresh foods are brought in. The Chicago Food Depository provided over 100,000 pounds of fruit and vegetables over the past year. This helped feed over 3,000 families.

Doctors in Idaho with low-income patients are beginning to add pantries in their clinic. They can “prescribe” fresh foods on the spot. In Delaware, a family can get up to 25 pounds a month from the local food bank with their doctor’s prescription.

Cost-Worthy

Food banks get their food from sources that they’d otherwise throw in the trash. (It’s perfectly fresh, but it may not look the “right” color or shape for commercial sale.) Additionally, money received from donations help purchase food for the facility. Nutritious foods can cost more, but researchers are examining the benefits of preventative spending. A family who eats better (so it’s hoped) will have fewer medical bills and less work-loss due to illness.

Currently, a clinical study is underway measuring if proper nutrition offered at food banks can help those with diabetes. In five years, the amount of fresh produce that’s become available in food banks has doubled. From July 2015 through June 2016, over one-billion pounds were distributed throughout the US.

It looks as if we’re heading in the right direction—food-wise and health-wise.

For more info on nutrition, best health practices, and current medical studies, check out www.GetThrive.com

CanaGel Melts

 

Superfood? It’s the Gift that Keeps on Giving…

Really a Superfood? It’s not unusual to hear someone declare, “Garlic is really good for you!” Yes, it is. But, here are a myriad of reasons why garlic is an incredible gift to our health.

Herb or Veggie?

Garlic is actually a member of the lily family, which starts as a bulb. It’s similar to onions and shallots, which are considered vegetables. Garlic also has leaves giving it further veggie credence. However, a herb is defined as a vegetable cultivated for medicinal or spiritual values. Hence, garlic must be a herb as well!

Good Stinky Breath and Skin

Garlic can be associated with bad breath, especially if you haven’t eaten any lately. Allyl methyl sulfide (ALM) is the compound that gives off the pungent odor when we eat it. During digestion, the sulfur passes into our blood stream.

The sulfur in garlic makes up vital amino acids used to create protein for cells, tissues, hormones, and antibodies. This is one reason why garlic helps boost our immune system.

When we sweat, the stinky ALM is emitted from our skin. This is beneficial because it helps release toxins. It also repels many types of insects, including some mosquitoes.

Red Tea Detox
Red Tea Detox

Beneficial Cancer-Repelling Compounds

Besides sulfur, garlic contains flavonoids, selenium, oligosaccarides, and arginine. All of these compounds have been linked to decreasing cancer-risk. Many fall into the antioxidant category.

Consumption of garlic has shown to decrease the risk of esophageal, stomach, prostate, breast, and colon cancers. In fact, most studies show the higher the quantity consumed, the lower the risk of developing the cancers mentioned earlier. Some components in garlic have proven to reduce the size and slow the growth of malignant tumors.

Immune Booster

T-Cells are produced in the thymus. The thymus is responsible for creating armies of white blood cells, which help fight infection in the body. Garlic has been shown to stimulate T-cells.

Studies done at the Mayo Clinic show garlic contains properties that help to boost the body’s levels of antioxidants, which work as a defense system against viruses.

Garlic consumption via food source or supplement is recommended for taming yeast infections. It is considered a powerful anti-fungal (along with Oregano, FYI.) Garlic also offers anti-bacterial properties. Some parasites and bacteria become defenseless against the chemical compounds in garlic.

Heart Lover

Garlic has proven to lower bad-cholesterol levels when eaten/taken on a daily basis. Additionally, studies have shown that garlic helps keep the aorta flexible. As we age, the blood vessel managing blood pressure can stiffen. Garlic can help keep your heart’s aorta from aging prematurely or from working too hard.

Clearly, the health benefits of garlic are immense. The best part, however, may be how it tastes mixed with a teeny bit of butter on a warm, just-out-of-the-oven, slice of healthy bread. Yum…

For more details about healthy foods and supplements, check out www.GetThrive.com

Turmeric Curcumin
Turmeric Curcumin

How To Lose Belly Fat For Women

What happened to the days where skin used to ping back into shape and eating a burger with fries had little effect on the circumference of the pants?  Sad to say those days are long gone and the reality of shifting the middle jiggle is a living nightmare.  In desperation to return to the leaner side of the tummy bulge, liposuction and even fat freezing has become popular.  However, quick fixes will not change that spare tire without some heavy duty planning and determination.  Get ready to tighten that belt and put those high wasted mom jeans back in the closet.  Warning: This belly-off advice may lead to dancing through the veggie isles whilst ignoring and laughing at the candy section.

 

THE DANGERS OF BELLY FAT

Studies show that belly fat has a link to genetics and depending on the body makeup, governs where the weight is stored or lost.  Women going through menopause are also prone to obtaining belly fat, due to the drop in estrogen levels. The fat dispenses from the buttocks and thighs, and it heads straight for the belly.  Visceral is the harmful kind of fat that is stored in the abdomen and wraps itself around the internal organs.  This fat should be taken seriously as it may cause the following problems:

 

 

Levels of a protein called Fibroblast growth factor-2, are found in visceral fat, where the FGF2 has the potential to stimulate these cells into tumors.  According to the Washington University School Of Medicine, belly fat can affect the outcome of women surviving kidney cancer.  Cancer sufferers who have substantial visceral fat have the average survival rate of 3 ½ years, compared to those who had little fat surviving 10 years or more.  There has not been any link of visceral fat and the length of cancer survival in men.

 

CONTROL THE BELLY FAT AND LOWER THE HEALTH RISK

According to research at the Mayo Clinic, a greater risk of death comes from having a large amount of belly fat, rather than a higher BMI (Body Mass Index).  So what to do to control this deadly fat?  First of all, there is no quick fix or fad diet that will solve this condition.  Lifestyle change and determination will not only help eliminate unsightly fat, but the dangerous fat too.

 

The following list will help keep the belly fat at bay:

  • Get rid of sugars. Choose whole fruits not fruit juices and view those fruits as sweet treats.  Eating too much sugar slows down or shuts off the lepton response, encouraging the feel of hunger.
  • Fat intake should consist of natural fats, like low fat plain yogurt, avocado, nuts, and olive oil.
  • Choose leaner proteins like salmon, skinless chicken, tofu, legumes.
  • Stay hydrated with water, to help detox and clear the body, as well as keep hunger under control.
  • Keep stress under control. Our body produces more cortisol when we are stressed and this hormone may influence weight gain.
  • Exercise at least twenty minutes a day can relieve stress, raise the heart rate and help combat the fat.  Try stomach crunches, leg lifts and weights for toning and high impact exercise to raise your heart rate (consult with a doctor or a professional before trying a new form of exercise).  Pilates or yoga are ideal for toning muscles, correcting posture and obtaining core strength.
  • Getting enough shut eye is extremely important, to keep hormones under control. Lack of sleep can activate ghrelin, which stimulates the appetite.
  • Drink less alcohol
  • Eat more soluble fiber like blackberries, avocados, split peas, black bean, lima beans broccoli, Brussel sprouts, oat bran, lentils, peas etc.

 

Vanity aside, belly fat is a potential killer and losing even a small amount of fat can lower the risk of disease and literally leave you feeling lighter.  With an unwavering mindset and strict rules, the spare tire can be lost at the side of the highway while racing away from health hazards to a new healthier and better body.

 

To read more on this subject visit getthrive.com

 

RESOURCES

Harvard Study

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3473928/

Belly Fat Workout

 

 

Too Little Protein? Long-Term Health Effects Not So Good

We need protein in our diet to stay healthy. But how much do we need so we don’t experience negative, long-term health effects?

A Must-Have

Protein provides essential amino acids to keep our bodies healthy. Diets that restrict protein may be placing you in future danger. On a day-to-day basis, consuming too little protein may make you lethargic. You may have an increased appetite. Either way, you’re not putting yourself in harm’s way—at least not today. On a long-term health scale however, too little protein will eventually cause cellular breakdown.

Protein amino acids help build cellular structure. They keep “housing” cells strong and functional. Such cells may be those that strengthen the walls of your heart. They fortify the muscles that protect your bones. Without the necessary amount of amino acids, those cellular structures will become weakened over time.

How Much?

How much protein we need is still up for debate. Some experts recommend consistent helpings throughout the day. A side benefit is that protein helps you feel fuller and provides energy for a longer period. All are in agreement, however, that some protein is better than none.

What happens if there’s too little consumption of protein? Wayne Campbell, a professor of nutrition science at Purdue University offers his expertise. He explains that your body will compensate and rescue its most important parts. The body will “take amino acids from your skeletal muscle in order to supply your heart or some other organs.”

This is comparable to how calcium is stolen from pregnant mothers. If the expectant mom has too little calcium intake, the growing baby will take it how he/she can. Years later, women find themselves with osteoporosis or other calcium-deficient caused disorders.

Don’t Worry, Eat Protein

Yes, the long-term negative effects of being protein-deficient are worrisome. The calming news is that more than likely, your regular diet provides an ample amount. There is protein in mostly all animal-sourced and plant-based foods. Unless you’re eating only carbohydrates, chances are you’re getting enough protein from an array of foods you consume.

Common foods containing protein are: poultry, fish, eggs, dairy, nuts, soy products, beans and peas.

Another aspect to consider is exercise. Physical movement also slows down age-related cellular breakdown. So, if you’re eating a sufficient amount of protein and exercising, your cells will maintain their strength longer. Way to keep your youth!

If you’re interested in diet, food, and exercise, check out more brief, informative articles here.

How to Improve Your Wellbeing and Become a Home Juicer

Are you tired of feeling physically uncomfortable, mentally foggy, and downright disgusted? Making changes to your diet has been found to radically reverse poor emotional health, the inability to lose weight, and even chronic illness. Home juicing just may be the catalyst you need to help restore your health—and maybe improve your overall wellbeing

Man Cannot Live on Juice Alone

The concept of juicing at home does not mean you give up on “food.” Juicing is a practice whereby you remove the juice from whole fruits and vegetables, often combining them into a refreshing beverage. This process provides vitamins and nutrients you may not be receiving otherwise. However, a superior juicing recipe may also include the pulp, seeds, and/or skin of your produce so that you garner other important elements such as fiber and minerals.

Why Juice?

The purpose of juicing is to provide valuable compounds your body needs and craves in today’s toxic world. Whether we realize it or not, we are bombarded with pollution. It’s very difficult to avoid the poisons traveling through our air, soil, and water at home and in the environment. We need extra doses of beneficial nutrients to combat toxins and protect our precious cells.

Vegetables and fruits contain flavonoids and anthocyanins. These are compounds that help guard our cells from damage. Extensive and/or chronic cellular damage can lead to cancer, heart disease, inflammatory disease, and other unwanted physical ailments. Ingesting anti-oxidants are essential nowadays for keeping the peace within our body.

Polluted Body?

If you know you’re eating fast food over twice a week, not exercising more than twice a week, drinking alcohol, smoking, and not sleeping enough, you can pretty much count on toxicity within. You may already be feeling the signs:

-always tired

-can’t lose weight

-get sick often

-have unexplained pain in joints

-constant gas, heartburn, constipation, or diarrhea

Your poor system is probably suffering from inflammation. You may even notice outward signs like poor skin color and texture, more wrinkles, tooth or gum pain, and no energy.

What To Do

You may try gathering information from trustworthy Websites such as GetThrive and VeryWell. Also, check with medical practitioners you trust. Ask friends or co-workers who juice and inquire about their experience.

Another idea is to look up some popular recipes for juicing at home. It’s simple and not very time-consuming. Make a commitment to juicing at least once a day for a month. Remember, it took a long time to get sick. Be patient with your healing process. Not far off, you may start noticing:

  • clearer, brighter skin
  • a calmer tummy
  • weight loss from bloat
  • fewer food cravings
  • a stronger immune system
  • more energy
  • overall more contentment

If adding more fruits and vegetables to your diet can improve your physical and mental health, why not try it?

Juicing can be used as a cleanse, a health boost, and a supplement to your regular healthy diet. Always check with your health care provider before embarking on any significant dietary shift. And also, health experts suggest including protein, low carbs, and good fats into your non-juicing meals.

A healthy diet, exercise, and a positive attitude significantly reduce your risk of contracting or developing disease. So think, adding juicing just may improve your internal and external health—a bonus to your overall wellbeing.

Dr. Dave Campbell Commentary

Juicing is one part of a healthy diet, exercise and lifestyle that provides nutrients and is low in calories. It is also a habit that tends to foster other health optimizing habits. Juicing takes time, effort and energy. Spending a few extra minutes a day washing, scraping, cutting and then plopping the fruits and veggies into the juicer will make you think twice later-on when a high-calorie, poorly nutritious, sugar-laden food is calling your name from the fridge. Juicing takes a bit of work. Why waste it on dessert.  Juicing has a myriad of positive health benefits and essentially no downside. When combined with good tasting, filling and well-balanced foods, regular modest exercise, and keeping a lid of unhealthy lifestyles like smoking and drinking too much, feeling better is surely just around the corner.

 

Quick, Nutritious Breakfasts That Will Fit Your Family’s Dietary Needs

(Fill in the blank): Breakfast is the most ________ meal of the day. Of course you know the answer! Maybe you’re still rushing to get yourself, the dog, the spouse, and the kids out of the house in the morning—yet you had good intentions of feeding everyone properly.

Here are 3 quick-to-make, protein-rich breakfast recipes that cover you and your family’s dietary needs. One is low-sugar, another low-fat, and another low-carb. Now all your bases are covered. Check ‘em out…

Low-Fat Banana Cocoa Smoothie

This is a simple recipe with a rich taste that also provides a wealth of protein, potassium, and magnesium. The caffeine content is just enough to give you a kick-start without the shakes. Skip the time or money used on a cup of coffee and feed yourselves this satisfying breakfast smoothie.

In a blender add:

  • 1 ripe banana
  • 2 ounces of plain Greek yogurt
  • 1 tablespoon almond butter
  • ½ cup almond milk
  • 1 tablespoon raw cacao nibs

Add ice and blend. Now you’ve got yourself a drink with very little fat (and it’s the good kind!), a bunch of protein, potassium to lower your water retention, and magnesium to boost your metabolism. Bottoms up!

Low-Sugar Blueberry Buckcakes

Mixing the ingredients should take five minutes and with a hot griddle waiting, each pancake only needs one minute of heat on each side. You could, conceivably, have this delicious, protein-packed, low-sugar breakfast ready to eat in under 10 minutes.

In a bowl, drop in:

  • ½ cup buckwheat flour
  • ½ cup whole-wheat flour
  • ¼ teaspoon powdered Stevia extract (or @ 6 drops of liquid Stevia)
  • ½ teaspoon baking powder
  • ¼ teaspoon baking soda
  • ¼ teaspoon salt

In a separate little bowl beat together:

  • 1 egg
  • ¼ teaspoon of vanilla
  • 1 tablespoon coconut oil
  • 1 cup sour milk (1 cup milk of your choice mixed with 1 teaspoon lemon juice to create acidity)

Pour wet mixture into dry ingredients bowl. Stir briefly. It will be lumpy. Add in ¾ cup of blueberries and fold in gently. If mixture is way too thick, toss in a tiny bit of water and continue to mix.

Place dabs of the mix onto the hot pan/griddle, flattening with a spatula. Flip them over to the other side when cakes are bubbling and the sides begin to brown. Remove from pan, cool briefly, and they are ready to devour!

Low-Carb Sun-Dried and Feta Omelet

This is a delicious, way to fill your belly with healthy ingredients while keeping carbs to a minimum.

In a bowl whisk together:

  • 2 egg whites and 1 egg (with yolk)
  • sprinkle in a ¼ tsp sea salt and 1/8 tsp black pepper
  • 1 teaspoon of fresh herbs- oregano would be delish
  • Butter your nonstick frying/omelet pan. Pour in egg mixture and heat until it “sets”.
  • Crumble 1 ounce of Feta cheese over the eggs
  • Place a few sun-dried tomatoes over the cheese.
  • Fold the egg in half, pressing down with spatula. Remove from skillet and enjoy!