What Do Detox and Wraps Have in Common?

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One of the latest trends amongst celebrities and health connoisseurs is to get wrapped like a sandwich and detoxify!

Saunas are So Yesterday

Saunas have long been recognized as a tool for detox and relaxation. Deep sweating has a bazillion proven health benefits. While sitting in a sauna, surely, you will sweat, big time. In addition to healing advantages, it creates a wonderful feeling from endorphins that release naturally.

Also, your core temperature rises. This, in turn, increases blood circulation, which can speed up the body’s natural healing process. Using heated infrared wraps, however, increases core temperature—but you don’t sweat like you would in a sauna.

Wrap with Benefits

This relatively recent trend takes sauna sessions to a whole new level. Clients are now, instead, wrapped in infrared sauna blankets. They lie in a makeshift bed, get burritoed up, and their core body temperature rises. There’s no sweating like in a sauna.

Founder of a new East Coast wrap facility, Ms. Berlingeri, explains that “Your body uses sweat as a way to cool down.” When the air is hot, you tend to sweat out minerals. But if the body isn’t trying to cool down as much, the amount of sweat decreases.

In a controlled environment, where the air is not hot, but your core body temp is raised, the detox reaction will be different. Berlingeri, along with others promoting the fad, claim that toxins are still released, but from a different source. She argues that water molecules vibrate, pulling toxins from fat cells.

Celebrity Testimonials

Whether you like them or not, their skin looks gorgeous. There are bunches of celebs who endorse the infrared wrap as a viable detoxification method. The session is aptly nicknamed an “urban sweat lodge.” Native Americans understand the benefits of deep sweat, but who knows if chiefs of yore would find this method legitimate.

Nonetheless, celebrity figures such as: Selena Gomez, Demi Moore, the cast of Orange is the New Black, and all of the Kardashian clan have partaken in the wrap—many of whom endorse the process as a method for attaining improved inner and outer beauty.

The Pundit Side

Raising core body temperature will, of course, fight off some evils. After all, that’s what a fever is all about, right? Whether wrapping yourself in an infrared blanket will burn away fat is something else to consider.

This technology was originally devised in France to help fuse broken bones. After many trials, it was discovered that the process burned a lot of calories. But that’s because the body was tricked into thinking it had a fever.

This is not a fix for weight loss. In fact, it may not be safe for those who suffer from high blood pressure. On the other hand, if one is hydrated properly before and after, who’s yet to say if this isn’t a remarkable, healthy, newfangled way of detoxing?

Immune Shroom
Immune Shroom

Am I at Risk for Colorectal Cancer (even if I’m 25 or 30)?

Medical providers generally suggest a colonoscopy for those 50 years old and above. There has been, however, a noticeable increase in rectal cancer for those in their 20’s and 30’s. What’s more worrisome is that the increase is not due to genetics, but perhaps, rather, environmental factors.

Spiking Rates

“Someone born in 1990 would now have twice the risk of colon cancer and four times the risk of rectal cancer than at the same, had they been born in 1950,” according to researchers at the American Cancer Society and the National Cancer Institute.

Frighteningly, colorectal is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the U.S. Lung cancer is the number one cancer killer.

How Could It Possibly Be Me?

Doctors and researchers cannot absolutely pinpoint the cause of this growing trend of younger people being diagnosed with colorectal cancer. One hypothesis is that someone in his 20’s is less likely to suspect that signs and symptoms of the disease are pointing towards cancer.

Screenings for this type of cancer, as mentioned, are not recommended for those under 50, unless they’re in a high-risk group. High-risk might include someone with Crohn’s, IBS, or an Autoimmune disease such as HIV. And because younger people aren’t paying attention to symptoms, and not getting tested, often the colorectal cancer is finally detected at more advanced stages.

Not having access to health insurance can also thwart someone from getting screenings or seeing a specialist.

Better if You’re Older

Because of suggested screenings, rectal cancer in those over 50 is often found at an early stage. Back in 1985, approximately 225 people out of 100,000 (over age 50) were diagnosed with colorectal cancer. As of 2013, those rates changed to 116 out of 100,000.  That’s a significant drop in numbers.

Additionally, when a 55-year old notices blood in her stool, she apt to question its origin more than a 25 year-old would. Often, blood found on toilet tissue is mistaken as a sign of bleeding hemorrhoids. Obviously we shouldn’t panic over certain signs, but there may be some that are worth discussing with a physician.

Some symptoms are:

-unusual sustained bloating

-unintended weight loss

-chronic constipation

-blood in stools

Keeping Calm

Yes, newer studies and data are showing increased numbers in younger people diagnosed with colorectal cancer. However, the truth is that the rate of people in their 20’s getting the disease has only increased by two cases for every 200,000 people per year. In 2013, the research showed that approximately 8 out of 100,000 adults under 50 were diagnosed positive for the cancer.

And although the colorectal cancer rates are rising slightly in the younger set, the mortality rate has not increased. Younger people are not dying at higher rates. It’s still fairly uncommon to be diagnosed if you’re under 50, but the rates are rising—and quickly.

Lifestyle, Environment, and Behavior

There is an increased risk of getting any cancer, amongst any age group, when “healthy, mindful living” isn’t part of one’s habitual daily life. Sure, there are folks who smoke, are obese, never exercise, and never get cancer. But, that might be called a “fluke” or “getting lucky.”

How we treat our bodies reflect how well it treats us. And sadly, there, too, are folks who get diagnosed with cancer who’ve taken great care of themselves all along. That unlucky roll of the die is most likely attributable to the toxins in our air, water, and soil.

Regardless, you can decrease your risk, overall, if you are mindful of the foods you eat, the air your breather, the water your drink, and your body’s stress levels. High fiber, low fat, organic foods can help keep your digestive system functioning at optimum capacity. Daily exercise also lends to expelling toxins, increasing oxygen-rich blood, and experiencing less tension and stress. All of these behaviors can certainly keep you healthier than if you didn’t practice them.

Sources:

http://www.clickorlando.com/health/born-in-the-90s-your-colon-cancer-risk-could-be-rising

https://www.cancer.org/cancer/colon-rectal-cancer/detection-diagnosis-staging/signs-and-symptoms.html

http://chicago.cbslocal.com/2017/03/01/doctors-warn-of-colon-rectal-cancers-spike-in-young-adults/

Lacking Motivation, Get Motivated? Try This!

You haven’t been exercising much, and from a dark pit, very deep in your stomach, a crabby voice nags, “Go to the gym.” You respond to that voice by ignoring it, telling it you’ll do it tomorrow, and/or shoving food in to shut it up. Bottom line: You’re having trouble motivating. Get Motivated!

“I’m taking care of my procrastination issues; just you wait and see.” – Anonymous

What Works For Some, May Not For Others

When that inner voice reminds you of what you “should’ be doing, there are several ways to react. Unfortunately, we often beat ourselves up just a little bit more. We call ourselves losers, rebel/act out, or withdraw and give up. Those aren’t really productive ways to deal with a slump.

One of the best ways to positively motivate just about anyone is to be kind, understanding, and respectful. Then, offer a reward. You can do that for yourself!

Start by making a list of the benefits you will reap from getting off the couch. In the meanwhile, read some of the quotes strewn throughout this piece—perhaps they will jar you into action.

“Many great things can be done in a day if you don’t always make that day tomorrow.”

Here is a list of suggestions to help you rekindle that motivation you had at one time to work that body:

1) You know you’ll feel better afterwards. (It’s so cliché but couldn’t be truer.)

2) It’s an excuse to wash your hair. (Not so often used, but it may work for someone…)

3) You can fantasize about food during your workout, without guilt.

4) Make a plan with a friend who will un-friend you if you cancel. Schedule a bike ride, run, walk, do whatever type of exercise with someone you like and who won’t cancel on you. You’ll get it done, and it’ll be fun.

“Do something today that your future self will thank you for.”

5) Download some movement-inspiring music onto your phone. Or, download a show or radio series you want to binge-watch/listen. If you’re not running outdoors, you can enjoy all of the above while on a treadmill, stair-stepper, or elliptical machine.

6) Start with small goals. You don’t have to go on a 9-mile hike. Take a brisk half-hour walk. That’s what will get you feeling successful and will reignite your motivation.

7) Buy something new and cute to wear while exercising. Baggy sweats do zilch for self-confidence. Even if you’re not in your best shape, something colorful, and trendy, without dryer fuzz balls or cat-claw pulls in the elastic will make you feel as good as you deserve.

8) Sweating releases toxins. If you imagine your body letting out the poison, you might get more motivated to perspire. Or, you might get grossed out. Hoping the “release” philosophy wins you over.

Procrastination is the art of keeping up with yesterday.”- Don Marquis

9) Workout now and then promise yourself a gift for later. It could be a cookie, a bubble bath, or a day off tomorrow from the gym.

10) Use social media as a way to get a pat on the back. Post a selfie while you’re working out like a beast. Or, after exercising, shower, then take a beautiful, clean selfie and brag about how hard you worked out earlier and how good you feel now. You’re sure to get many “likes”.

Whatever you have to do to manipulate yourself into exercising, just do it. You know you have to. So stop procrastinating. Don Marquis said, “Procrastination is the art of keeping up with yesterday.”

Why not choose this sentiment instead? … “A year from now you wished you started today.”  If you apply it, you’ll start today. Then a year from now, you’ll have no regrets, and you’ll be in some badass shape.

Poisonous Toxins in Your Home?

Toxins are Everywhere

At the risk of sounding like a complete downer, it’s an unfortunate fact that our air is polluted. What many of us don’t realize is that common household products emit toxins. Everything from our furniture, carpeting, paint, candles, hair gel, cosmetics, and more, contain dangerous pollutants. Fortunately, there are ways to combat the toxicity—which also includes collecting indoor plants.

What’s in the Air?

In 2011, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services added formaldehyde to our list of known carcinogens. Believe it or not, this toxin is used a variety of products. Formaldehyde is used to treat wood flooring, particle board, and some furniture. It’s also found in carpet, paint, and building glue. The smoke from cigarettes emits the chemical’s fumes. Even in some fabrics, formaldehyde is used to make “wrinkle-free” clothing. And let’s add nail polish to this as well.

So, although there are known carcinogens, somehow they are still allowed in products we consume daily. And unfortunately, we’re not always aware of an item’s true ingredients. Hence, in order to combat potential health risks, here are some tips to help keep your family toxic-free.

What to Do

If you smoke cigarettes, quit now. Nothing good health-wise can come to you or anyone else from the emissions. Speaking of emissions, your clothes dryer can infiltrate your home with dangerous pollutants. Avoid fabric softener and dryer sheets. They contain “fragrance” with includes toxic chemicals. Try plant-based detergents or even hang clothes to dry.

Mood lighting is lovely, but scented candles can be poisonous. Synthetic candles emit benzene, which is another known carcinogen. Opt for pure beeswax if you love candles. For a nice scent, try organic essential oils for aromatherapy.

Ventilation is key in your home. Fresh air can help dispel toxins coming off your furniture, walls, and even from your shower. Our water is full of chlorine, which is essentially toxic in large amounts. Get a filter for your showerhead to reduce airborne gases from spreading through your home. Additionally, that will reduce chlorine from entering your body through your skin.

Green is Good

Recently NASA made some incredible discoveries about indoor plants. They’ve been studying plants’ effect on air quality for about two decades now. As it turns out, many of these common household plants remove formaldehyde, benzene, and other dangerous pollutants from the indoor air. Here is a list of 20:

Aloe Vera, areca palm, elephant ear philodendron, lady palm, bamboo, rubber plant, dracaena, English ivy, dwarf date palm, ficus, Boston fern, peace lily (dangerous to cats), golden pothos, Kimberely Queen fern, chrysanthemums, Gerbera daisy, dragon tree, red emerald philodendron, parlor palm, and the spider plant.

To read more helpful tidbits about keeping our families and our planet healthy, check out www.GetThrive.com

A Connection between Alzheimer’s and Aluminum?

Aluminum found in Alzheimer’s Patients

The purpose of deodorant is to alter the scent of body odor, which is created from a mixture of sweat and bacteria. Deodorant doesn’t stop you from sweating. Antiperspirants are formulated to clog pores so less sweat escapes. Deodorants contain fragrance and/or anti-bacterial compounds. Antiperspirants contain aluminum salts.

In the late 1980s, studies began, which explored the nature of aluminum in our products and the resultant levels found in our bodies. Surely traces are found in everyone because some exposure to aluminum is inevitable since it is omnipresent in our world. Only one study, conducted in 1990, showed toxic levels in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients. That study has since been discredited because the data was provided by patient surrogates, not directly from the patients. Additionally, scientists have since hypothesized that the high levels of aluminum found in the brain may be a result of having Alzheimer’s disease. Dying cells are often unable to eliminate toxins, making them more likely to contain high levels of the metal.

Another study was published in 2002. Those researchers followed more than 4,500 people who used antiperspirants and antacids for several years. No toxic levels of aluminum or increased risk of getting Alzheimer’s was concluded. So is it safe to moderately use a product that contains aluminum salts? These reports make it appear so.

But if you’re a person who errs on the side of caution, it may not be just be the antiperspirant you want to consider. Many deodorants contain fragrance. The vast majority of chemicals in synthetic fragrances are on the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) hazardous waste list. Loopholes allow toxins such as benzenes, aldehydes, and phthaltes to be used in our cosmetics without constraint or regulation. Phthalates are hormone disrupters that are linked to cause breast cancer, reduce sperm count, onset of diabetes, obesity, and reproductive malformations.

You can also try deodorants that only use organic, plant-based compounds (no artificial fragrance.) For antiperspirant, the crystal may help, but remember, it too, may contain aluminum salts. So if you’re completely running scared at this point, you can opt to use nothing and just stay on top of it by washing your armpits with soap and water a few times a day. Don’t be afraid to sweat, it’s good for you. As for the odor, don’t sweat it (couldn’t resist the pun)—a healthy diet and proper hygiene should keep it manageable.